Reader Comments


I am pleased that your book has been completed and published. I share your belief in testimony and shall read yours with the interest it surely deserves.

Elie Wiesel
(Nobel prize recipient)

...

I read this book in one sitting; it was so riveting that I could not put it down. The book covers a variety of events during World War II but the main focus is on Dachau and its liberation by the 45th Thunderbird Division of the Seventh Army. New information about the liberation of Dachau debunks some of the previously published accounts and describes the heroism of the Thunderbird Division. At a time when Holocaust denial is rampant, this book tells the true story of the atrocities committed at Dachau. The author based his book on eye-witness accounts by American soldiers. There are also old black and white photos, never before published. This book should be required reading in every school in America.

"Gen Baugher"

...

I found the book remarkable. Eighteen years in the making, it is not the usual regimental history one generally found in books about World War II. Major combat actions are very well covered by detailed accounts at the personal and small unit level. It also weaves six little known combat stories of World War II in Europe throughout the actions which throw a whole new light on many aspects of World War II in Europe.

(Combat veteran)

...

Once started reading “The Thunderbird”, I could not put it down. So many things I thought I had put to rest came flooding back. It was not a pleasure to read, but once started, there was no stopping. This has to be a reference for Holocaust historians and an effective answer to the nay-sayers.

(American prisoner, Berga Concentration Camp)

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On that day, the battle-hardened GIs walked into Hell. The sights, sounds and smells they encountered left us shattered. That was the day the Thunderbird cried.

(Combat veteran, 45th Infantry Division)

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I was fascinated by “The Thunderbird” and found it to be very easy reading. Could not put it down until I had read all the stories. There were so many facts that I had never heard of before. The decimation of the 106th Infantry Division was particularly heart rendering.

(Combat infantryman)

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I found the details concerning minority groups in the army during World War II of special interest. No one I ever knew had heard about the contributions made by the Comanche Indians during the Allied invasion of Europe. The role played by the Japanese American GIs was also of great interest to me. “The Thunderbird” filled in many gaps in my knowledge of World War II.

(College student)

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Finished reading your book yesterday and really enjoyed it. “The Day the Thunderbird Cried”, is absorbing, informative and a great read. I particularly liked the format you followed throughout the book. You are to be commended on a job well done.

(American liberator of Dachau Concentration Camp)

...

This 326 page book is complete with an index, a time line of key events in the Nazi rise to power and effort to conquer all of Europe, a glossary of terms, an appendix of factual support materiel, and is supplemented with many excellent pictures. I highly recommend it to all as a must have addition to your WW II library.

(American infantry general)

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Your book broke me up, twisted me and opened up a few recollections that I put to bed and never intended to resurrect. Your book is a high water mark, something by which Holocaust scholars can measure their understanding.

(Dachau liberator, 45th Infantry Division)

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I think you have done history a service. I think your book belongs on every reference shelf that addresses the Holocaust and WWII. You don’t alibi, you don’t accuse, you don’t deny, you don’t condemn. In promoting your book, quote me as an eyewitness participant who cries with the Thunderbird and whose life has reflected that experience. I applaud your work. I encourage any institution, library or museum to recognize the input of not one author, but dozens of personally involved and rapidly disappearing survivors.

(Infantry sergeant, liberator of Dachau)

...

I have read your book and it is one of the most authentic of all the various books and stories of World War II I have read. The title, “The Day the Thunderbird Cried” is such a meaningful phrase in itself and implies so much of the feeling of the men who were there. While mind boggling to imagine and heart rendering to believe, I think you have captured an essence of the war that will long be remembered.

(American Dachau liberator)

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I believe you have earned the gratitude of all who went through the horrors of the concentration camps by adding to the testimony of what transpired therein! I know you have mine!

(American concentration camp survivor)

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I can only imagine how much time and effort you put in gathering all the detailed information you have in your book. As far as I am concerned, you have given the most accurate account of my unit, the 522 FA BN and Dachau.

(Liberator, Dachau survivors, Lt., 522nd FAB)
Member of the famous 442nd Infantry Division (Hawaii)

...

I just finished reading your book a little while ago. I’m very impressed with your years of time-consuming work toward its completion. All the intricate bits of information and personal individual experiences are very dramatic. I enjoyed it immensely. I’m amazed at how you were able to accumulate all the info!

(Liberator of Dachau, 42nd Infantry Division)